News

News

Your Overview of Data AdditionsSep 28, 2016

A quick run-through of the highlights for the last two weeks of additions


Expanding coverage of BIS databases

One of our most eagerly anticipated additions is part of an ongoing effort to offer the complete collection of Bank of International Settlements (BIS) databases. Most recently, additions were made to the Credit-to-non-financial sectors database, an example of which you’ll see in the chart below. To explore this and other BIS data, click on the link provided in the list at the end of this post.


Macrobond chart

EBA Risk Dashboard & key risk indicators

From the European Banking Authority (EBA) we bring you the Risk Dashboard and key risk indicators. The Risk Dashboard summarizes the main risks and vulnerabilities in the banking sector in the European Union. The data is produced by evaluating the evolution of risk indicators from a sample of banks in the EU.


Macrobond chart

What else is new?

As usual, other additions to the database include more detailed coverage across emerging and developed markets, for economic and financial indicators. From Monetary statistics for Azerbaijan and business and consumer confidence indices for Israel, to loans to non-financial corporations in Ireland, and demand for business credit in Brazil.


Macrobond chart Macrobond chart

Data by country

Azerbaijan

Monetary Statistics

Brazil

Serasa Experian Demand for Business Credit

Chile

Financial System Deposits

Indonesia

Value of Non-Oil and Gas Imports by Commodity

Ireland

Private Sector Credit & Deposits

Israel

Business Confidence Index
Consumer Confidence Index

Italy

Contractual Wages

Japan

BOJ Monetary Policy Meetings

Libya

Monetary Base
Foreign Trade
nternational Reserves
Public Finance

Macao

Overnight and Same-Day Visitors by Country

Malaysia

Deposits by Type

Namibia

Broad Money

New Zealand

ANZ Inflation Gauge

Peru

Consumer Confidence Index

Philippines

Universal and Commercial Banks' Deposits

Puerto Rico

Gross National Product
Gross Public Debt

Spain

Tourist Movements on Borders

Sweden

Financial Soundness Indicators by IMF

Turkey

Foreign Direct Investment

U.K.

Quarterly Stamp Duty Statistics
Rents Data

Regional/Global

BIS: Credit to GDP
EBA: Risk Dashboard & Key Risk Indicators

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Your Overview of Data AdditionsAug 31, 2016

More detailed data for developed markets: Australia, US, UK, and Switzerland


This week we’re highlighting four additions to our developed markets data. For the most part these additions focus on providing a more detailed view of indicators such as GDP or consumer confidence. But make sure to have a look at the data list to see the other data additions. Providing comprehensive coverage of emerging markets is something we continue to build on.


Australia: Components of the consumer confidence rating

Macrobond chart


US Federal Reserve data on bond premiums

Macrobond chart


UK rates of return data

Macrobond chart


Swiss GDP data by canton

Macrobond chart


Data by Country/Region

Australia

Roy Morgan Consumer Confidence Index Sub-components

Belize

National Accounts

China

Foreign Currency Reserves & Other Foreign Currency Assets

France

RICA Agricultural Data

Hong Kong

Domestic Export & Re-export of Goods
Household Income Survey by Sex & Age

Indonesia

Investment Loans & Working Capital Loans by Industry

Iran

Consumer Price Index
Producer Price Index

Japan

Broad Unemployment Rate
Miki Office Report
National Survey of Household Savings & Liabilities by Age Group of Household Head

Luxembourg

Core Inflation
GVA for Economy Sectors

Monaco

Demography & Education
Domestic Trade
Labor Market

Slovakia

Banking Interest Rates

Switzerland

GDP by Canton
Regional GVA by Sectors

U.K.

Rates of Return of Investments
Rightmove House Prices Regional Trends

U.S.

Recession Risk & the Excess Bond Premium

OECD

Financial Accounts (accessed by country under Main economic indicators)

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OECD ANA data addedAug 24, 2016

More progress in the OECD data project with the addition of ANA data to the application database.


Government expenditure by function (COFOG)

This data provides you with a breakdown of government expenditure, grouped by government function. The OECD ANA data is primarily organized by country, so you’ll find it under OECD, ANA Annual National Accounts, select the country, and then Government Expenditure by Function. Below is an example of how the data is broken down into categories, under total government expenditure, for Belgium.

OECD > ANA Annual National Accounts > Belgium > Government Expenditure by Function (COFOG)


COFOG

Government deficit/surplus, revenue, expenditure & main aggregates

This data is intended to provide an accurate representation, to the extent it is possible, of the aggregates and balances of the general government sector. For most countries data is also available for subsectors of general government. Again, this subset of data is primarily organized by country and can be accessed accordingly.

OECD > ANA Annual National Accounts > Australia > Main Aggregates of General Government & Its Sub-Sectors > Simplified General Governments Accounts


Simplified General Governments Accounts

Simplified non-financial accounts

This set covers data from gross value added to net lending, and net borrowing. The example below shows the subcategories of the set, which is organized by country, in this case Italy.

OECD > ANA Annual National Accounts > Italy > Simplified Non-Financial Accounts


Simplified Non-Financial Accounts

Non-financial accounts by sector

This data spans the whole of non-financial accounts, from production accounts to acquisition of non-financial assets accounts.

OECD > ANA Annual National Accounts > Sweden > Non Financial Accounts by Sectors > Non-Financial Accounts by Sectors


Non-Financial Accounts by Sectors

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Your overview of data additionsAug 2, 2016

National Accounts for Iran, Market expectations for Argentina & Manufacturing orders for Germany


A Varied Group of Data Additions

This week we've added data across frontier, emerging, as well as developed markets, from the basic to the niche. What can I say? There isn’t always a clear trend- I’m sure you can relate.


To give you a preview, we’ve added survey data of market expectations from Argentina’s central bank, national accounts data for Iran, monetary aggregates for Ghana, housing affordability data for Hong Kong, and more detailed and extensive coverage of Manufacturing: New orders data for Germany.


With such a variety of data being added, it’s definitely worth spending a little more time on the list of data additions this week, to see what could be of interest to you. As usual, you’ll find links to the data below the charts, listed by country and region.


Macrobond chart


Macrobond chart


Macrobond chart


Macrobond chart


Data by Country

Argentina

Market expectations survey (REM)

Brazil

Leading indicators

China

Annual IIP

Short-term liquidity operations

Local government bond yields: AAA & AAA rates

France

Average debt maturity

Egypt

IIP

Germany

Manufacturing: New orders

Ghana

Money supply

Greece

Arrivals by country & region

Hong Kong

Affordability Ratio

Iran

National accounts: Expenditure approach

National accounts: Income approach

National Accounts: Production approach

Nigeria

FX Spot Rates

IIP

Singapore

CCI

South Africa

CPI Weights

Switzerland

Employment by region


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Your Overview of Data AdditionsJul 18, 2016

Surveys and frontier markets.


Surveys

This week survey data has been added from a variety of sources. Both worldwide, and UK specific indicators were added. In the chart below you’ll see the EPU Index, and Migration Fear Index, as well as a chart showing consumer confidence data for the UK. Click on the charts or use the links at the end of the post to further explore the data.


Macrobond chart



Macrobond chart


Frontier & Emerging Markets

Core indicators have been added for Papua New Guinea. The first additions of data from local sources from this country include balance of payments, CPI, government and public finance data, and national accounts.


Macrobond chart


For Saudi Arabia banking and credit, and balance of payments data has been added. The chart below covers data for consolidated balance sheets of commercial banks for the country.


Macrobond chart


Data Additions by Country

Global

Migration fears & economic policy uncertainty

China

Population by province

Denmark

Registered sales of weekend cottages – Regional level

France

INSEE employment data by department

Ireland

Domestic GFCF

Japan

Government bond trading volume - Category of investor

Government bond trading volume - Totals

Malaysia

IIP – Local & abroad

New Zealand

Weekly oil price monitoring

Norway

Applications for asylum

Papua New Guinea

Balance of payments

Consumer price index

Government & public finance data

National accounts

Saudi Arabia

Consolidated balance sheet of commercial banks

International investment position

Spain

CPI weights

U.K.

GFK - UK consumer saving index


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Your Overview of Data AdditionsSep 14, 2016

A quick run-through of the highlights for the last two weeks of additions


2016 US Election-winner predictions

At this stage, news of the US general election is ubiquitous, seemingly more so than usual, if that’s possible. So if ever a data addition was au courante, this one would be the dictionary definition of the word: US election-winner data from PredictWise, producing a new prediction every 2-3 minutes (frequency is daily in the application). If you’re not familiar with PredictWise it’s good to know that they analyze individual level- markets, polls, and historical- data (big data), with a primary focus on markets. For those of you who can’t stand the suspense, you’ll find the answer you’ve been looking for in the chart below. Note that the example shows the probability of each candidate winning, rather than the margin by which they will win.


Macrobond chart

UK

If you’ve trained your eye on what’s happening in the UK after the now less talked-about, but still relevant Brexit, you may be interested to know that you can easily look up BOE MPC meeting dates in the application. Not something we’re going to make a pretty chart of, but definitely worth marking in your calendar.

Emerging Markets

From China we bring you an addition to our social financing datasets. Besides monthly flows, and yearly aggregates, you can view the data as a 12-month rolling sum, making it easier to read.


Macrobond chart

Urban Audit from Eurostat

A valuable source of insight into urban conditions in cities in the EU and EFTA, the Urban Audit provides indicators of the quality of life in these cities. The data cover demography, housing, health, labor market, education, and environment, amongst others. Data is available for all countries covered by the source. However, the links provided in the list below navigate to a single country to serve as an example of where the data is located in the tree.

Global

From the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) comes the Short Term Energy Outlook, providing an overview of the energy markets both globally and for the US. The chart below takes a look at the Brent spot average, supply, and consumption data, highlighting when supply exceeds consumption and vice versa.


Macrobond chart: EIA - Short Term Energy Outlook

Data by region

Chile

Predetermined short-term net drains on foreign currency assets


China

Total: Social financing 12-month rolling sum


Finland
Shares of GDP


Germany

IAB labor market barometer

Japan

Public debt held by the central bank, by individual instrument


Iran

Monetary aggregates


Puerto Rico

Gross public debt

National accounts


Spain

Monthly labor cost per worker


Taiwan

Deposits & loans


U.K.

BOE MPC meetings

Population estimates

Scotland land & building transaction tax


U.S.

EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook

PredictWise: Winner of the US 2016 general election

Public debt held by the central bank, by individual instrument


OECD

Discouraged Workers

Involuntary Part Time Workers

Labor force participation rate, by sex


Eurostat (Data organized by country, links provide example of placement in tree.)

Farm labor statistics


Urban Audit: Larger urban zones & cities breakdown for various topics

Demography

Living conditions

Education & training

Culture & tourism

Labor market

Economy & finance

Transport

Environment

Perception Survey


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IMF : CDIS data added to MacrobondAug 24, 2016

The Coordinated Direct Investment Survey (CDIS) is a worldwide statistical data collection effort led by the IMF. The aim is to improve the quality of direct investment position statistics, by collecting and making available data for international investment position as well as for immediate counterpart economies. This provides a greater understanding of cross-border, financial interconnectedness. The data covers a breakdown of direct investment positions, typically including net equity and net debt positions. The CDIS is conducted annually, with data starting from 2009.

CDIS data is now (as of July) available in Macrobond, for all users. Access it here IMF > CDIS .


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Macrobond chart


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Your Overview of Data AdditionsAug 16, 2016

BoE Bank liabilities survey, U.S. Shared National Credit data, & granular data for emerging markets


BoE Bank Liabilities Survey

Macrobond chart


The next Bank Liabilities Survey from the Bank of England will be released on the 14th of October 2016. Until then, we have added the data from past surveys for you to peruse. This is a quarterly survey, providing insight into lenders views on the past-  and coming- 3 months. The survey provides a better understanding of the role of lenders' liabilities and capital in driving credit and monetary conditions.

“The survey covers developments in the volume and price of bank funding; developments in the loss-absorbing capacity of banks as determined by their capital positions; and developments in the internal price charged to business units within individual banks to fund the flow of new loans, sometimes referred to as the ‘transfer price’”.

- Bank of England


U.S. Shared National Credit program

The SNC program is intended to review and asses risk in the largest and most complex credits shared by multiple financial institutions. The data refers to credits of at least $20 million, shared between 3 supervised institutions or more.


Emerging markets: More granular data

You’ll find more granular data for emerging markets is being added on an ongoing basis. The latest additions include real estate data for Brazil, foreign trade data for Macedonia, and a variety of additions for Iran (best to check the list for those).


Macrobond chart


Macrobond chart


Data additions by country

Brazil

Housing rental index

International investment position

China

PMI manufacturing by enterprise size

Remittance & overseas transfer

Denmark

Number of enterprises  

Iran

Active population

Balance of payments

Construction

External debt

Foreign trade

Government budget

National Accounts;

Production index of large manufacturing establishments

Total population

Unemployment

Israel

Commercial bank assets

Kenya

Arrival statistics

Macedonia

Foreign trade

Export & import by commodity

Mexico

International investment position

Mozambique

Balance of payments

Namibia

Balance of payments

Norway

Number of enterprises

Peru

Commercial banks’ assets

Singapore

Residential households by type of dwelling

Sweden

Number of Enterprises

U.K.

Bank of England: Bank Liabilities Survey

Northern Ireland composite economics index

U.S.

Shared National Credit Program


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Ruminations on The Development Process – Part 3Jul 25, 2016

How do we plan the next version?


If you hadn’t noticed, we launched a new version of the application on the first of July 2016. Macrobond 1.16. You can read about it here if you want to catch up on all the new features that were added. In light of this I want to write about what goes into the planning of a new version. A bit of a behind the scenes view, so to speak. Why do some things get added and others don’t? And how do we decide?


The Basics

The first thing you should know is that we have a very long list of things that we would like to add to our product. And new things are added to that list all the time. There are many reasons why we can’t just do them all at once.


One obvious reason is resources.

Developing a product is expensive. It doesn’t scale very well. If you double the number of people working on a software project, you are very lucky if you speed things up by 50%. It is kind of logarithmic with quickly diminishing returns on the investment.


Adding a basic version of a feature first in order to get feedback from the users.

We use this well proven strategy before taking the next step. But for this to work, things need to sink in. If we rush ahead too quickly, we might end up moving in the wrong direction.


Changing the product too quickly puts a strain on the users.

Users need to be educated and learn to use the new features. Some users like new things; others hate when things are changed.


Long term planning – rarely works

Things are changing all the time. So are priorities. Over the years I have spent countless hours making long term plans and doing detailed time estimates. This has been a waste of time. Long term plans never hold. New things come up and priorities change before the full plan is executed. If you choose to ignore this and stick to the original plan, you end up with an inferior product. If you abandon the plan you have wasted all that time planning and there is always someone who expects you to deliver. And to deliver on time.


Time estimates – rarely work

Even if you make it very clear that the time estimates are very uncertain, they still tend to be taken as a promise, and there is always someone who is upset by the “delay”.

What about making a good time estimate? Very time consuming. And you really have to dig into the details in order to make even a fairly rough estimate. Essentially, to make a perfect time estimate, you might need to spend as much or more time on the estimate as on the implementation. The effect is that you have moved the uncertainty of how long it takes to implement a feature from the implementation phase to the planning.


What will you add next year? - I am proud to say, I don’t know!

This is how we do it:
  • We aim to deliver a new version every 3-5 months.
  • When we have implemented all the features for a new version we let internal and beta testers use it for 1-2 weeks in a final test phase. From then on we will only work on bug fixes.
  • During the final test phase, we take a look at our long list of things we would like add to the next version of the product and pick some things from the list that we think would take 3-5 months to implement.

We often implement a basic version of a feature in a given version, and then refine it in future versions. That way we get feedback before taking the next step, which results in a better product.


Taking things as they come

It does happen that our time estimates are completely wrong. If things are easier to implement, and so take less time, we consider adding more things to that version. If things take a much longer time, we can either postpone that version, add the feature to the next version or, in the worst case, skip it altogether.

This approach gives us a lot of flexibility to adapt our development to changing conditions. It also makes it possible to respond quickly to new important requirements. If we implement complex features in several smaller steps, it gives us an opportunity get feedback. Taking on shorter projects also works better for most people. It makes it possible to focus hard on something for a few months and then take a breath before you move on to something new. Some things we do might be rocket science. But we are not building a rocket to the moon with an absolute deadline, where work on the project is complete when it is launched. We are in this for a long time!


So, what’s the catch?

One drawback is that we cannot provide a long term roadmap. We certainly have some long term ideas about the direction in which we’re heading, but we do not know how long it takes to get there. My experience is that most long term ideas will never be realized because they are out of fashion, priorities change, and other things become more important.

For this reason, we don’t communicate our long term ideas. Because if we do, we cannot be as flexible as we need to be. Even if they are just ideas, there would be pressure to deliver.


How do we decide which features to add next?

We look at a number of factors when we decide what things to attempt to do in the next version.

  • The priority we get from customer feedback.
  • The amount of time it takes to build something.
  • Looking forward.
    We try to add features that no one has asked for, but that we think would be useful for many users.
  • Developer resources.
    Some of us are better at certain things. There can also be conflicts if several developers work on the same “area” of the application.
  • Interdependencies.
    Interdependencies require building one feature before we can build another feature with a higher priority. There might also be dependencies on other parts of our IT infrastructure or data that must be in place before we can do our part.
  • Technical requirements.
    Sometimes we need to adapt to new technical requirements, such as new versions of Windows or Office.
  • Diversity.
    It’s preferable to try and include some improvements in all of the main areas of the application for most versions. For instance, we may try to improve charting functionalities in each version.
  • Housekeeping and maintenance.
    Every now and then we need to replace parts of the internal plubming in the application just in order to have a solid foundation to build on in the future.
  • Fun.
    I must admit that there have been cases where we have done some things just because they are more fun to build than some other thing.

Now I need to stop writing! We have a new version to plan and I need to do some real work.

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Finding data by conceptJul 6, 2016

A new feature for faster, more intuitive data navigation

User intentions

They're what drive the way we design data navigation at Macrobond. Organizing data to reflect your intentions for it? By far the simplest and quickest way to gather what you're looking for.

But, your intentions aren't always the same. This is why we work with multiple views for the economics database.

You're probably familiar with the Economics - by country (major), and Economics - by source views, for example.

By country is ideal when you want to view all the data for one country, in one place. When your focus is on the releases of a particular source, then it's by source you should be using.


Economics - by concept

Today we want to introduce the by concept view. It's an on-going project, to make navigating data as efficient as possible in the application. The by concept view is for when you're interested in a particular indicator, but want to compare the data across a variety of countries or regions. It removes the repetitive work of searching for, and selecting the data for each entity individually.

When navigating the by concept view you're able to access the data via two categories, National sources or All sources.


National Sources

Navigating via National sources will allow you to find data sourced from national sources, such as statistics agencies, and central banks.


National sources

All Sources

Under All sources you'll find the majority of the data is sourced from International organizations such as BIS, IMF and OECD. However, national sources are, as the name suggests, also included in the All sources view.


All sources

Both of these views allow you to drill down by standardized subcategories, the same as those you'll see in the by country views. So, you're always dealing with a familiar pattern.


Excel Integration

As with all the other views, navigating the data this way is not only done within the application, but can also be done from within Excel, as you can see below.


By Concept Excel
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